Concealed carry

On the first day of the historic veto override session, the Louisiana Senate was unable to garner enough votes to nix the governor’s veto of a bill that would’ve allowed Louisiana residents to carry concealed handguns without a permit.

Senate Bill 118, one of two hot-button measures that led to the first-ever veto session this week, would have removed training and permitting requirements to carry a concealed weapon.

The law would have applied to people 21 and older.

During its initial passage during the Regular Session, the House voted for it 73-28 and the Senate voted for it 27-9.

Needing 26 votes to advance to the House, it failed on a 23-15 vote.

In his original statement explaining his reasoning for the veto, Gov. John Bel Edwards said the current system “strikes the right balance of ensuring that people can bear arms while also keeping reasonable permitting and training processes in place.”

Though he called himself “a strong supporter of the Second Amendment, and an enthusiastic outdoorsman and hunter,” Edwards said the current system is “reasonable and responsible.”

“It is a matter of basic public safety and numerous law enforcement leaders across the state opposed the bill for this reason, especially as it relates to the enhanced risk posed to their officers,” Edwards said.

“Simply put, it is not too much to ask that a person who wishes to carry a concealed weapon in public be required to attend basic marksmanship and safety training so they understand the regulations associated with such an action.”

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