marvin henderson

Marvin Henderson

Some say that age brings wisdom, but it also brings us more in touch with mortality.      

We obviously think about that with ourselves, but also with the people who come and go. I’ve obviously thought about that because of the date of this edition, which would have marked my mother’s 71st birthday (She left us in 2005).

After 35 years in the newspaper business, I’ve bid farewell to many folks, both in the newsroom and within the community. Jeff David and Mike Dowty quickly come to mind, as do some of the folks I’ve met in just six years with The News. It happens more often as I get older.

Marvin Henderson, who died Wednesday, will be among those people whom I’ll never forget.

I had heard about him long before I ever came to work in Livingston Parish, and every time I drove along U.S. 190, I wondered about that vast red building with the name “Henderson Equipment” on the outskirts of the Town of Livingston.

The building had a commanding presence, but it dwarfed that of its owner.

He came up frequently in conversations with Jeff and Mike, sometimes for his involvement in business and government and other activities in the area. It didn’t take long to figure out that Marvin stayed busy.

I saw him from time to time, most often when I’d grab a bite at Wayne’s BBQ, owned and operated by Marvin’s younger brother.

Just as most people described him, he had a commanding presence when he’d enter the room.

He usually had a smile on his face and often said something that would make me laugh even when I was in the middle of eating.

He always introduced himself as “Wayne’s younger brother,” which was always good for a laugh. Marvin was several years older than Wayne, and most people were aware of that.

The talk would go from what was going on in business to the news of the day, some it on the national level and most of it right down the road at the courthouse.

As I would learn from everyone else who came around him, he did not know a stranger. He greeted me with a warm, hearty handshake every time we crossed paths.

Much of how people described him coincided with what I knew about him already. He had a commanding presence, he always helped others and always enjoyed a good chat.

Come to think of it, the Town of Livingston has lost a few such figures just in the past few years.

We said goodbye to former Mayor Nick Erdey (father of Sen. Dale Erdey) several years ago, along with former Mayor Jim Miller, Vallery Watts of V. Watts Furniture, Registrar of Voters Delmas Taylor and Deral Jones, predecessor to current Mayor David McCreary.

Those are a lot of folks who have played a significant role in both the town and parish.

The passing of time brings with it some great experiences along the way, but many of which bring a tear to one’s eye.

It’s a feeling many within the parish and many other areas probably feel with Marvin’s departure.

As with some of the other folks I mentioned, the benefits from his contributions will extend far beyond his lifetime.

RANDOM THOUGHTS

Memories of a man “larger than life”

Some say that age brings wisdom, but it also brings us more in touch with mortality.

We obviously think about that with ourselves, but also with the people who come and go. I’ve obviously thought about that because of the date of this edition, which would have marked my mother’s 71st birthday (She left us in 2005).

After 35 years in the newspaper business, I’ve bid farewell to many folks, both in the newsroom and within the community. Jeff David and Mike Dowty quickly come to mind, as do some of the folks I’ve met in just six years with The News. It happens more often as I get older.

Marvin Henderson, who died Wednesday, will be among those people whom I’ll never forget. I had heard about him long before I ever came to work in Livingston Parish, and every time I drove along U.S. 190, I wondered about that vast red building with the name “Henderson Equipment” on the outskirts of the Town of Livingston.

The building had a commanding presence, but it dwarfed that of its owner. He came up frequently in conversations with Jeff and Mike, sometimes for his involvement in business and government and other activities in the area. It didn’t take long to figure out that Marvin stayed busy.

I saw him from time to time, most often when I’d grab a bite at Wayne’s BBQ, owned and operated by Marvin’s younger brother.

Just as most people described him, he had a commanding presence when he’d enter the room. He usually had a smile on his face and often said something that would make me laugh even when I was in the middle of eating.

He always introduced himself as “Wayne’s younger brother,” which was always good for a laugh. Marvin was several years older than Wayne, and most people were aware of that.

The talk would go from what was going on in business to the news of the day, some it on the national level and most of it right down the road at the courthouse.

As I would learn from everyone else who came around him, he did not know a stranger. He greeted me with a warm, hearty handshake every time we crossed paths.

Much of how people described him coincided with what I knew about him already. He had a commanding presence, he always helped others and always enjoyed a good chat.

Come to think of it, the Town of Livingston has lost a few such figures just in the past few years. We lost former Mayor Nick Erdey (father of Sen. Dale Erdey) several years ago, along with former Mayor Jim Miller, Vallery Watts of V. Watts Furniture, Registrar of Voters Delmas Taylor and Deral Jones, predecessor to current Mayor David McCreary.

Those are a lot of folks who have played a significant role in both the town and parish. The passing of time brings with it some great experiences along the way, but many of which bring a tear to one’s eye.

It’s a feeling many within the parish and many other areas probably feel with Marvin’s departure. As with some of the other folks I mentioned, the benefits from his contributions will extend far beyond his lifetime.

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